COACHES

Jeff Fisher
Head Coach

Biography

In January of 2012, Owner/Chairman E. Stanley Kroenke hired Jeff Fisher to be the 22nd full-time head coach in franchise history. In his first two seasons in St. Louis, Fisher has led the team to 14 wins while helping reshape the roster into a talented young group that undoubtedly has the Rams headed in the right direction.

In 2013, St. Louis made significant strides in all three phases. Defensively, the Rams finished ninth in the NFL against the run, which continued a trait that has been consistent of Fisher’s teams throughout his coaching career. In 18 full seasons as a head coach, Fisher’s teams have finished in the top 10 against the run 13 times. Last season was the Rams’ first top 10 finish against the run since 2001.

A year after leading the NFL in sacks, the Rams finished third in the NFL in sacks and ranked second in the league in sacks per pass play in 2013. St. Louis was led by First-Team All-Pro Robert Quinn, who led the NFC and set a new Rams single-season record with 19.0 sacks. Quinn’s 19.0 sacks are the most by a player on a team led by Fisher.

Despite some adversity, particularly at the quarterback position, the Rams saw increased production offensively in 2013 as well. Last season, St. Louis scored 27 or more points on six different occasions. From 2009-12, the Rams scored 27 or more points six total games in that time span. In addition, the Rams scored 38 touchdowns in 2013, which was the most the franchise has scored in a season since the 2006 squad found the end zone 39 times.

The Rams’ success came despite the fact that starting QB Sam Bradford missed the final nine games of the season due to a knee injury. At the time of his injury, Bradford was playing perhaps the best football of his career. Veteran Kellen Clemens led St. Louis to four victories in its final nine games.

Under Fisher’s guidance, the Rams boasted one of the NFL’s top special teams units. The St. Louis punt coverage team, led by Johnny Hekker, set a new single-season NFL record for net punting average (44.2). Hekker was named First-Team All-Pro and made his first trip to the Pro Bowl at the conclusion of the season.
Despite having one of the NFL’s youngest units for a second season in a row, St. Louis enjoyed success in every area of the kicking game. Rams opponents averaged just 2.6 yards per punt return, which was the lowest in the NFL. In addition, K Greg Zuerlein was 26-of-28 on field goals.

In his first year on the job, Fisher guided the league’s youngest team to a 7-8-1 record, which gave the Rams their best winning percentage since 2006. A total of 18 rookies saw game action for the Rams in 2012, giving Fisher’s squad a talented young nucleus to build around. Two of the team’s top three draft picks – DT Michael Brockers and CB Janoris Jenkins – were named to Pro Football Weekly’s All-Rookie team as the two played key roles on a young defense.

Statistically, the Rams made huge gains in several areas in Fisher’s first season. St. Louis tied for the NFL lead in sacks with 52. The Rams also improved from 26th in points per game allowed to 14th (tied) in Fisher’s first season. Offensively, St. Louis went from 31st in total yards in 2011 to 23rd in 2012, and the Rams allowed 20 fewer sacks last season compared to the previous year.

Fisher boasts 19 full seasons as an NFL head coach. Among active NFL head coaches, only New England’s Bill Belichick, who is also entering his 19th season, has as much experience as Fisher. With 156 career victories, Fisher ranks 16th on the NFL’s career wins. Entering 2014, he’s third among active coaches, trailing only Belichick (199) and Tom Coughlin (158).

Fisher joined the Rams after spending 16 full seasons as head coach of the Tennessee Titans, 11 as executive vice president. In his tenure with Tennessee, he guided the Titans to six playoff appearances (1999, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2007, 2008), three division titles (2000, 2002, 2008), two AFC Championship games (1999, 2002) and one Super Bowl appearance (XXXIV). From 1999-2010, only three teams had more playoff berths (Indianapolis, Philadelphia and New England). In the 2000s, Fisher totaled 97 victories, the most successful decade in franchise history.

Fisher’s teams have featured stout rushing defense, as well demonstrated the ability to run the ball effectively. His rush defense ranked in the Top 10 in 12 out of 16 seasons with the Titans, a trend that as previously noted, continued in 2013. Fisher’s rushing offense finished in the Top 10 eight times during that same time span. Prior to Fisher’s arrival in St. Louis, the Rams finished 31st in theNFL in rushing defense. St. Louis ranked 15th in the category in 2012, and RB Zac Stacy rushed for 973 yards in 12 starts, the third-highest rookie total in franchise history.

In 2009, the Titans began the season 0-6, but Fisher steadied the team to win eight of the final 10 games to finish the season 8-8. It marked the first team in NFL history that a team won more than six games in a season after starting 0-6.

The 2008 season was one of the most successful in Titans history. Tennessee captured the AFC South title, matching a franchise best 13 wins and setting a franchise record with 10 wins to start a season. In addition, eight players earned Pro Bowl honors.

During his tenure with Tennessee, Fisher also had success with rebuilding young teams and transforming them into contenders, which is the same task he undertook when he arrived in St. Louis. In 2005, Fisher headed the youngest team in the NFL and the youngest NFL team in more than a decade. That season, with a win over the Houston Texans (10/9/05), he became just the 17th coach to reach the 100-win mark with one team. He led the Titans through a retooling period that saw the team grow from 4-12 that year, to 8-8 in 2006, and a playoff berth in 2007, the first playoff appearance since 2003.

During the 2006 season, Fisher became the first coach in franchise history to lead the team in 200 contests, reaching the milestone in a game against Baltimore (11/12/06). He became only the 12th coach in NFL history to coach 200 games with one team, joining George Halas, Tom Landry, Don Shula, Chuck Noll, Curly Lambeau, Bud Grant, Steve Owen, Bill Cowher, Joe Gibbs, Hank Stram and Marv Levy (Mike Shanahan joined the list in December of 2006 to make 13 coaches).

In 2004, Fisher became the fourth youngest coach (46) to win 90 regular season games since 1960. Only John Madden (41), Don Shula (41), and Bill Cowher (44) were faster to 90 wins.

In 2003, the Titans reached the divisional round of the playoffs for the fourth time in five years after earning a Wild Card berth with their 12-4 regular season record. The defense ranked first against the run, the offense scored the second most points in franchise history (435), and the team became just the third franchise since 1970 to score 30 or more points in six consecutive games.

After starting the 2002 season with a 1-4 record, Fisher rallied the team to win 11 of the next 12 games to capture the AFC South title and earn an appearance in the AFC Championship game. In 2000, Fisher became the fifth coach in NFL history to lead his team to consecutive 13-win seasons, joining Mike Ditka (Chicago Bears, 1985-86), George Seifert (San Francisco 1989-90), Marv Levy (Buffalo Bills, 1990-91) and Mike Holmgren (Green Bay Packers, 1996-97). The defense ranked No. 1 in the NFL for yards allowed and surrendered the third-lowest point total in the league since 1977.

One of the Titans’ most memorable seasons under Fisher was the 1999 campaign, where he led the team to its first AFC Championship and an appearance in Super Bowl XXXIV. The Titans became only the sixth Wild Card team to earn a trip to the Super Bowl since the NFL added the playoff round in 1978. Fisher guided the Titans to a streak of 13 consecutive wins against AFC Central Division opponents dating back to 1998. It marked the longest streak in the history of the Central Division and the third longest in the NFL since the 1970 merger.

Fisher originally joined the Oliers’/Titans’ coaching staff in 1994, after spending two seasons as the defensive backs coach for the San Francisco 49ers. He was elevated to head coach in November 1994, replacing Jack Pardee, for the final six games of the season. Fisher was instrumental in guiding the transition following the Oilers’ move to Tennessee in 1996.

Prior to San Francisco, Fisher reunited with his college coach John Robinson, serving as the Los Angeles Rams’ defensive coordinator.

Fisher began his coaching career as an assistant for Buddy Ryan and the Philadelphia Eagles in 1986, coaching the defensive backs for three seasons before becoming the NFL’s youngest defensive coordinator in 1988. In 1989, the Eagles’ defense led the NFL in interceptions (30) and quarterback sacks (62). In 1990, Philadelphia’s defense paced the league in rushing defense and ranked second in quarterback sacks.

A former defensive back at the University of Southern California, Fisher played for Robinson in a star-studded defensive backfield that included future NFL stars Ronnie Lott, Dennis Smith and Joey Browner. Fisher’s career college statistics included five interceptions and 108 tackles. The versatile Fisher also served as the Trojans’ backup kicker and earned Pac-10 All-Academic honors in 1980.

Originally a seventh-round draft selection of the Chicago Bears in 1981, Fisher appeared in 49 games as a defensive back and return specialist in five NFL seasons. He earned a Super Bowl ring following Chicago’s 1985 Super Bowl season, despite spending the year on injured reserve with an ankle injury that prematurely ended his playing career. During that season, Fisher began his post-playing career by assisting Ryan as an “unofficial” coach as the Bears ultimately defeated the New England Patriots in Super Bowl XX.

He left Chicago in 1985 holding a number of team records including: number of punt return yards for a season with 509 yards in 1981, number of punt returns in a season with 58 in 1984, and number of punt returns in one game with eight on Dec. 16, 1984, at Detroit. He also recorded the longest punt return by a Bear in 39 years with an 88-yard return for a touchdown on Sept. 20, 1981, against Tampa Bay.

A native of Southern California, Fisher was a high school All-America wide receiver at Taft High School in Woodland Hills, Calif. Fisher is an avid fisherman and golfer and he also does considerable work off the field.

He also gives back to the NFL, serving on the NFL Competition Committee since 2000. We was a co-chairman of the committee from 2001-10. Although he was out of coaching in 2011, Fisher served as an advisor to the Competition Committee, and he officially rejoined the group last spring after he was hired by the Rams. The committee is instrumental in guiding the league through rule changes and ways to improve the game.

In 2001, Fisher was named the winner of the Horrigan Award, given by the Pro Football Writers of America to the NFL representative that is the most cooperative with the media. Additionally, Fisher was named the 2000 Tennessean of the Year by Nashville’s Tennessean newspaper and 1999 Sports Person of the year by the Nashville Sports Council.

Fisher (born 2/25/58) has three children: sons Brandon and Trent and daughter Tara. Brandon is the Rams’ assistant secondary coach, and Trent recently concluded his collegiate playing career as a defensive back at Auburn University.

In January of 2012, Owner/Chairman E. Stanley Kroenke hired Jeff Fisher to be the 22nd full-time head coach in franchise history. In his first two seasons in St. Louis, Fisher has led the team to 14 wins while helping reshape the roster into a talented young group that undoubtedly has the Rams headed in the right direction.

In 2013, St. Louis made significant strides in all three phases. Defensively, the Rams finished ninth in the NFL against the run, which continued a trait that has been consistent of Fisher’s teams throughout his coaching career. In 18 full seasons as a head coach, Fisher’s teams have finished in the top 10 against the run 13 times. Last season was the Rams’ first top 10 finish against the run since 2001.

A year after leading the NFL in sacks, the Rams finished third in the NFL in sacks and ranked second in the league in sacks per pass play in 2013. St. Louis was led by First-Team All-Pro Robert Quinn, who led the NFC and set a new Rams single-season record with 19.0 sacks. Quinn’s 19.0 sacks are the most by a player on a team led by Fisher.

Despite some adversity, particularly at the quarterback position, the Rams saw increased production offensively in 2013 as well. Last season, St. Louis scored 27 or more points on six different occasions. From 2009-12, the Rams scored 27 or more points six total games in that time span. In addition, the Rams scored 38 touchdowns in 2013, which was the most the franchise has scored in a season since the 2006 squad found the end zone 39 times.

The Rams’ success came despite the fact that starting QB Sam Bradford missed the final nine games of the season due to a knee injury. At the time of his injury, Bradford was playing perhaps the best football of his career. Veteran Kellen Clemens led St. Louis to four victories in its final nine games.

Under Fisher’s guidance, the Rams boasted one of the NFL’s top special teams units. The St. Louis punt coverage team, led by Johnny Hekker, set a new single-season NFL record for net punting average (44.2). Hekker was named First-Team All-Pro and made his first trip to the Pro Bowl at the conclusion of the season.
Despite having one of the NFL’s youngest units for a second season in a row, St. Louis enjoyed success in every area of the kicking game. Rams opponents averaged just 2.6 yards per punt return, which was the lowest in the NFL. In addition, K Greg Zuerlein was 26-of-28 on field goals.

In his first year on the job, Fisher guided the league’s youngest team to a 7-8-1 record, which gave the Rams their best winning percentage since 2006. A total of 18 rookies saw game action for the Rams in 2012, giving Fisher’s squad a talented young nucleus to build around. Two of the team’s top three draft picks – DT Michael Brockers and CB Janoris Jenkins – were named to Pro Football Weekly’s All-Rookie team as the two played key roles on a young defense.

Statistically, the Rams made huge gains in several areas in Fisher’s first season. St. Louis tied for the NFL lead in sacks with 52. The Rams also improved from 26th in points per game allowed to 14th (tied) in Fisher’s first season. Offensively, St. Louis went from 31st in total yards in 2011 to 23rd in 2012, and the Rams allowed 20 fewer sacks last season compared to the previous year.

Fisher boasts 19 full seasons as an NFL head coach. Among active NFL head coaches, only New England’s Bill Belichick, who is also entering his 19th season, has as much experience as Fisher. With 156 career victories, Fisher ranks 16th on the NFL’s career wins. Entering 2014, he’s third among active coaches, trailing only Belichick (199) and Tom Coughlin (158).

Fisher joined the Rams after spending 16 full seasons as head coach of the Tennessee Titans, 11 as executive vice president. In his tenure with Tennessee, he guided the Titans to six playoff appearances (1999, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2007, 2008), three division titles (2000, 2002, 2008), two AFC Championship games (1999, 2002) and one Super Bowl appearance (XXXIV). From 1999-2010, only three teams had more playoff berths (Indianapolis, Philadelphia and New England). In the 2000s, Fisher totaled 97 victories, the most successful decade in franchise history.

Fisher’s teams have featured stout rushing defense, as well demonstrated the ability to run the ball effectively. His rush defense ranked in the Top 10 in 12 out of 16 seasons with the Titans, a trend that as previously noted, continued in 2013. Fisher’s rushing offense finished in the Top 10 eight times during that same time span. Prior to Fisher’s arrival in St. Louis, the Rams finished 31st in theNFL in rushing defense. St. Louis ranked 15th in the category in 2012, and RB Zac Stacy rushed for 973 yards in 12 starts, the third-highest rookie total in franchise history.

In 2009, the Titans began the season 0-6, but Fisher steadied the team to win eight of the final 10 games to finish the season 8-8. It marked the first team in NFL history that a team won more than six games in a season after starting 0-6.

The 2008 season was one of the most successful in Titans history. Tennessee captured the AFC South title, matching a franchise best 13 wins and setting a franchise record with 10 wins to start a season. In addition, eight players earned Pro Bowl honors.

During his tenure with Tennessee, Fisher also had success with rebuilding young teams and transforming them into contenders, which is the same task he undertook when he arrived in St. Louis. In 2005, Fisher headed the youngest team in the NFL and the youngest NFL team in more than a decade. That season, with a win over the Houston Texans (10/9/05), he became just the 17th coach to reach the 100-win mark with one team. He led the Titans through a retooling period that saw the team grow from 4-12 that year, to 8-8 in 2006, and a playoff berth in 2007, the first playoff appearance since 2003.

During the 2006 season, Fisher became the first coach in franchise history to lead the team in 200 contests, reaching the milestone in a game against Baltimore (11/12/06). He became only the 12th coach in NFL history to coach 200 games with one team, joining George Halas, Tom Landry, Don Shula, Chuck Noll, Curly Lambeau, Bud Grant, Steve Owen, Bill Cowher, Joe Gibbs, Hank Stram and Marv Levy (Mike Shanahan joined the list in December of 2006 to make 13 coaches).

In 2004, Fisher became the fourth youngest coach (46) to win 90 regular season games since 1960. Only John Madden (41), Don Shula (41), and Bill Cowher (44) were faster to 90 wins.

In 2003, the Titans reached the divisional round of the playoffs for the fourth time in five years after earning a Wild Card berth with their 12-4 regular season record. The defense ranked first against the run, the offense scored the second most points in franchise history (435), and the team became just the third franchise since 1970 to score 30 or more points in six consecutive games.

After starting the 2002 season with a 1-4 record, Fisher rallied the team to win 11 of the next 12 games to capture the AFC South title and earn an appearance in the AFC Championship game. In 2000, Fisher became the fifth coach in NFL history to lead his team to consecutive 13-win seasons, joining Mike Ditka (Chicago Bears, 1985-86), George Seifert (San Francisco 1989-90), Marv Levy (Buffalo Bills, 1990-91) and Mike Holmgren (Green Bay Packers, 1996-97). The defense ranked No. 1 in the NFL for yards allowed and surrendered the third-lowest point total in the league since 1977.

One of the Titans’ most memorable seasons under Fisher was the 1999 campaign, where he led the team to its first AFC Championship and an appearance in Super Bowl XXXIV. The Titans became only the sixth Wild Card team to earn a trip to the Super Bowl since the NFL added the playoff round in 1978. Fisher guided the Titans to a streak of 13 consecutive wins against AFC Central Division opponents dating back to 1998. It marked the longest streak in the history of the Central Division and the third longest in the NFL since the 1970 merger.

Fisher originally joined the Oliers’/Titans’ coaching staff in 1994, after spending two seasons as the defensive backs coach for the San Francisco 49ers. He was elevated to head coach in November 1994, replacing Jack Pardee, for the final six games of the season. Fisher was instrumental in guiding the transition following the Oilers’ move to Tennessee in 1996.

Prior to San Francisco, Fisher reunited with his college coach John Robinson, serving as the Los Angeles Rams’ defensive coordinator.

Fisher began his coaching career as an assistant for Buddy Ryan and the Philadelphia Eagles in 1986, coaching the defensive backs for three seasons before becoming the NFL’s youngest defensive coordinator in 1988. In 1989, the Eagles’ defense led the NFL in interceptions (30) and quarterback sacks (62). In 1990, Philadelphia’s defense paced the league in rushing defense and ranked second in quarterback sacks.

A former defensive back at the University of Southern California, Fisher played for Robinson in a star-studded defensive backfield that included future NFL stars Ronnie Lott, Dennis Smith and Joey Browner. Fisher’s career college statistics included five interceptions and 108 tackles. The versatile Fisher also served as the Trojans’ backup kicker and earned Pac-10 All-Academic honors in 1980.

Originally a seventh-round draft selection of the Chicago Bears in 1981, Fisher appeared in 49 games as a defensive back and return specialist in five NFL seasons. He earned a Super Bowl ring following Chicago’s 1985 Super Bowl season, despite spending the year on injured reserve with an ankle injury that prematurely ended his playing career. During that season, Fisher began his post-playing career by assisting Ryan as an “unofficial” coach as the Bears ultimately defeated the New England Patriots in Super Bowl XX.

He left Chicago in 1985 holding a number of team records including: number of punt return yards for a season with 509 yards in 1981, number of punt returns in a season with 58 in 1984, and number of punt returns in one game with eight on Dec. 16, 1984, at Detroit. He also recorded the longest punt return by a Bear in 39 years with an 88-yard return for a touchdown on Sept. 20, 1981, against Tampa Bay.

A native of Southern California, Fisher was a high school All-America wide receiver at Taft High School in Woodland Hills, Calif. Fisher is an avid fisherman and golfer and he also does considerable work off the field.

He also gives back to the NFL, serving on the NFL Competition Committee since 2000. We was a co-chairman of the committee from 2001-10. Although he was out of coaching in 2011, Fisher served as an advisor to the Competition Committee, and he officially rejoined the group last spring after he was hired by the Rams. The committee is instrumental in guiding the league through rule changes and ways to improve the game.

In 2001, Fisher was named the winner of the Horrigan Award, given by the Pro Football Writers of America to the NFL representative that is the most cooperative with the media. Additionally, Fisher was named the 2000 Tennessean of the Year by Nashville’s Tennessean newspaper and 1999 Sports Person of the year by the Nashville Sports Council.

Fisher (born 2/25/58) has three children: sons Brandon and Trent and daughter Tara. Brandon is the Rams’ assistant secondary coach, and Trent recently concluded his collegiate playing career as a defensive back at Auburn University.

 

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